Automotive Industry Data
Subscribe  |  FREE SAMPLE   Front Page Editions  |  Current Issue page 1  |  BACK COPIES  |  Info  |  REPORTS  |  CONSULTANCY SERVICES  |   CONTACT  |  MEMBERS 
BRIC  |  CHINA  |  DIESELS  |  EDITORIALS  |  ELECTRIC  |  NEW PRODUCT  |  PREMIUM BRANDS  |  STOCK MARKET VIEW  |  TRUCKS  |  USA  |  WESTERN EUROPE

AID EXCLUSIVE

WESTERN EUROPE
Stick change still dominates 
In Europe manuals rule, but steady inroads from more fuel-efficient automatics
Published: Tue, 17 Dec 2013 20:15:05 GMT
 

Range Rover automatic transmission

When it comes to a carís transmission, manuals seem so yesterday. 

Thatís the first off impression from AIDís exclusively compiled car production figures for last year, showing that the near two decade long drive to two-pedal cars has continued to accelerate.

On the face of it, last year saw the setting of yet another milestone. 

Thatís in the sense that more cars than ever rolled off Europeís assembly lines with an automatic transmission, continuing a trend that began to gather momentum with the millennium change in
2000.

Cars built with an automatic transmission now account for a highest-ever share of European car production

There are three broad trends sweeping West Europeís car markets: one is the rise and rise in the popularity of SUV-Crossovers, which, regardless of the regionís still lingering car sales famine, have continued to win sales at the expense of other sectors. 

Another is the unstoppable drive towards lower consumption cars.

Thatís highlighted on the one hand by the realisation that more than half the new cars sold in Western Europe today are still equipped with a diesel engine
...more

MORE LIKE THIS:


Europeís November car motor dogged by renewed misfire  17 Dec 2013


Better October car sales lift gloom, 3rd rise in four months  19 Nov 2013


W-Europeís car market finally moves out of intensive care  19 Nov 2013



To continue reading this article, please register for a free sample without obligation...

Please note that eagleAID.com is a subscriber-only site, and as such it can only be viewed by subscribers to the newsletter.